PMB News Center

The Secret Language of Microbes

The fungus Neurospora colonizing a burnt tree in the Lake Tahoo region after a fire (Photo by John Taylor)

N. Louise Glass discovers different dialects

By Robert Sanders, UC Berkeley

Fungi communicate by chemical signals only, but they, like humans, appear to use different dialects.

This discovery came from a UC Berkeley study of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, a red bread mold that has been studied in the laboratory for nearly 100 years.

Many fungi, including N. crassa, grow as filaments or hyphae that often fuse to form an interconnected network. Hyphal networks have been shown to be important to many fungi, including the mycorrhizal fungi that form associations...

Matt Traxler, 2016 Searle Scholar

Investigating the role of specialized metabolites in mediating bacterial interactions

Matt Traxler, assistant professor in the Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, has been named a 2016 Searle Scholar. The Searle Scholars Program supports the independent research of exceptional young faculty in the biomedical sciences and chemistry.

Traxler will receive $300,000 in flexible funding over the next three years to fund his research investigating the role of specialized metabolites in mediating bacterial interactions. Specialized metabolites include antibiotics, antifungals, and anti-cancer agents. The Traxler lab aims to use knowledge about how these metabolites function...

Outstanding Graduate Student Instructors at PMB

berkeley seal

Riva Bruenn, Sydney Glassman honored

Riva Bruenn, one of UC Berkeley's outstanding Graduate Student Instructors for 2016, uses games and inclusion to get students engaged and learning from each other. "Involving the whole class in teaching each lesson engages everyone on different levels, and causes students to accept more of the responsibility of learning," said Bruenn. Along with Graduate Student Sydney Glassman she has been named an outstanding Graduate Student Instrucor (GSI) for the department and the campus. "The students who are furthest ahead take the most active role in teaching, which keeps them...

17th Annual Microbiology Student Symposium

Happening Friday, May 6, 2016; Registration open now

The Microbiology Student Group at UC Berkeley invites you to join us for the 17th Annual Microbiology Student Symposium (MSS) on Friday, May 6, 2016 at the David Brower Center in Berkeley. This year, our keynote speakers are Victoria Orphan from Caltech and Micheal Laub from MIT.

The MSS provides a forum for students researching all topics in microbiology to present their research to an engaged group of students, scientists, and members of the general public interested in microbiology. In addition, attendees will have the...

Apply Now for PMB Graduate Programs

Cal Script

Application deadline is December 1, 2014

The admissions application for the 2015 Graduate Program in Plant & Microbial Biology is now available.

To find out more about our Plant and Microbial Biology programs, please visit: pmb.berkeley.edu/graduate-programs

Helpful Links

Research Focus - Plant & Microbial Biology Research Focus - Graduate Group in Microbiology Plant and Microbial Biology Faculty Page Graduate Group in Microbiology Faculty Page ...

MAD Science - Understanding Cellular Signaling

"Acceleration without restraint" can be disastrous

By Karyn Houston Plant & Microbial Biology

A team of researchers led by the Quail Lab at UC Berkeley has zeroed in on the important process of “attenuation,” the way cells guard against potentially harmful overreactions to the external cues that enable them to adapt to prevailing conditions.

"In the biosciences, defects in signaling attenuation mechanisms are under increasing scrutiny in both medical and agricultural areas," said Peter Quail, professor in the Department of Plant & Microbial Biology at UC Berkeley and research director at...

Starving Out the Enemy

Mary Wildermuth's research combats mildew attacks

How to Starve Out the Enemy

By Wallace Ravven It looks harmless enough – a light dusting like baby powder sprinkled on the leaves. But as rose lovers know, powdery mildew can attack new buds and shoots, stunt growth and distort plant development.

If not controlled, the fast spreading...

A Win-Win for Farmers and the Environment

PMB Researchers explore ways to reduce the use of fertilizers

By Armand Parajon

A mid-career grant for a UC Berkeley researcher will go toward finding ways to reduce the use of fertilizers in agriculture, while still maintaining high yields.

Plant & Microbial Biology Professor Sheng Luan has been awarded $1.9 million from the National Science Foundation to figure out how plants can take up nutrients more efficiently while using less fertilizer.

Cooperative Extension Specialist Peggy Lemaux, also from PMB, is co-principal investigator for the project.

The Problem with Fertilizers...

N. Louise Glass Receives Award

At the 44th Symposium for Research in Bamberg, Germany

UC Berkeley was well represented at the 44th Symposium for Research Award Winners of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation held in Bamberg, Germany between March 17th-20th, 2016.

Awardees included Professors Jeffrey A. Reimer, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Ulrike M. Malmendier, Economics, Daniel Tataru, Mathematics and N. Louise Glass, Plant and Microbial Biology.

Glass is shown in the photo receiving her award from Professor Helmut Schwarz, President of the Humboldt Foundation. Each of the awardees will be spending 6-12 months working with colleagues in Germany....

PMB at Cal Day April 16, 2016

Magic show, micro garden, microbiology and more

By Karyn Houston Plant & Microbial Biology

The Department of Plant and Microbial Biology will be participating in UC Berkeley's Cal Day on Saturday April 16, 2016. PMB students and faculty will be presenting and hosting all sorts of activities that revolve around plants and microbes. Cal Day is one of the ways PMB interacts with the Berkeley community and future Golden Bears along with their families. From 11 am to 2 pm, visit PMB at the Genetics and Plant Biology lawn, located next...

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