PMB News Center

Simplifying Confusing and Complicated Food Labels

Earlier this month, the Food Marketing Institute and Grocery Manufacturers Association announced they would voluntarily streamline date labels and begin using two standard phrases: “best if used by” for quality and “use by” for highly perishable items like meat, fish and cheese that can be dangerous to eat if they are too old.

Food manufacturers will begin phasing in the change now, with widespread adoption expected by summer 2018.

UC Berkeley graduate student Becky Mackelprang, who helped organize a panel discussion last year on food waste, said consumers can make a difference by...

Fungible Fungi

mushrooms image by Christine Liu

Tom Bruns shares the importance of fungi

By Sonia Travaglini, UC Berkeley

We all know the cute, round button mushroom Agaricus bisporus in our British fry-ups and the delicate, slender enoki mushroom Flammulina velutipes in our Vietnamese pho—but there are millions of fungi species.

Professor Tom Bruns of the Department of Plant and Microbial Biology at UC Berkeley studies the ecology and evolution of fungi. He is working to understand how plants depend on and live with fungi all across California. Bruns explores the symbiotic associations of fungi with plant roots, called mycorrhizae....

From a Single Genetic Mutation, Secrets of ‘Boy in the Bubble’ Disease Revealed

By Brett Israel, UCB Media Relations

UC Berkeley was part of an interdisciplinary, international research team that has identified the rare genetic mutation responsible for a unique case of “boy in the bubble” disease, known as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a deadly immune system disorder. The researchers found that the cause was a mutated version of a gene called BCL11B, which also plays an unexpected role in the normal processes of immune system development.

The discovery of this genetic mutation is the latest of several breakthroughs from this team, which has been accomplished by...

Niyogi Elected Fellow of AAAS

Professor Kris Niyogi honored for his distinguished efforts to advance science and its applications

Excerpted from an article by Robert Sanders, UCB Media Relations

Kris Niyogi, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, Professor and chair of Plant & Microbial biology and faculty scientist at Berkeley Lab, was cited for “pioneering investigation of the regulation of photosynthesis and mechanisms of photoprotection in plants and algae.” Niyogi and his colleagues recently re-engineered a plant to use sunlight more efficiently, boosting yields by 20 percent.

The Niyogi Lab studies photosynthetic energy conversion and its regulation in...

Freeling Awarded McClintock Prize

Mike Freeling awarded prize for his pioneering contributions to the understanding of genome biology in plants

By: Brett Isreal

UC Berkeley geneticist Michael Freeling has been awarded the McClintock Prize for Plant Genetics and Genome Studies for his fundamental contributions to the understanding of gene and genome biology in plants.

The prize, which recognizes scientific accomplishment over the course of a career, is awarded annually by the Maize Genetics Executive Committee, a professional organization for scientists and researchers working in the field of maize genetics. It is named in honor of Barbara McClintock,...

Crop Yield Gets Boost with Modified Genes in Photosynthesis

Berkeley and Illinois researchers increase plant proteins that result in more efficient use of sunlight

By: Sarah Yang

Plant biologists have bumped up crop productivity by increasing the expression of genes that result in more efficient use of light in photosynthesis, a finding that could be used to help address the world’s future food needs.

Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley), and the University of Illinois targeted three genes involved in a process plants use to protect themselves from damage when...

Glass Joins Leadership at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Division Director for Environmental Genomics and Systems Biology

Professor N. Louise Glass, former chair of Plant & Microbial Biology, has accepted the position of Director of the Environmental Genomics and Systems Biology (EGSB) Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL).

She will continue as a professor at UC Berkeley while she leads the division, beginning in July, 2016. Glass will take over from Trent Northen, who served as the Interim Division Director for EGSB since the Biosciences reorganization at the LBNL was launched last year.

Glass is an international leader in fungal...

College Campuses Take on Food Waste

Students across the UC system coming together to combat food waste

If you piled up all the perfectly edible food that Americans throw away each day, it would fill the Rose Bowl, twice. Put another way, about 40 percent of food in the United States goes uneaten – Americans toss out $165 billion worth of food each year.

“It’s a really huge number,” said UC Berkeley graduate student Becky Mackelprang. “Reducing that number could make a very big impact on society.”

At college campuses around the country, students like Mackelprang are at the...

Kris Niyogi Elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Kris Niyogi (Photo by Kris Dadacay)

One of the highest honors a scientist can achieve

Kris Niyogi, professor and chair of Plant & Microbial Biology, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors a scientist can achieve.

Niyogi joins five other superstars from UC Berkeley who were also elected May 3, 2016. They include Ian Agol, professor of mathematics; Steven N. Evans, professor of statistics and mathematics; Robert M. Glaeser, emeritus professor; Susan Marqusee, director of QB3; and Peidong Yang, professor of chemistry.

Niyogi studies photosynthetic energy conversion and its regulation in algae...

The Secret Language of Microbes

The fungus Neurospora colonizing a burnt tree in the Lake Tahoo region after a fire (Photo by John Taylor)

N. Louise Glass discovers different dialects

By Robert Sanders, UC Berkeley

Fungi communicate by chemical signals only, but they, like humans, appear to use different dialects.

This discovery came from a UC Berkeley study of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, a red bread mold that has been studied in the laboratory for nearly 100 years.

Many fungi, including N. crassa, grow as filaments or hyphae that often fuse to form an interconnected network. Hyphal networks have been shown to be important to many fungi, including the mycorrhizal fungi that form associations...

Pages